Paparazzi UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle)

June 20, 2017

Paparazzi UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) is an open-source drone hardware and software project encompassing autopilot systems and ground station software for multicopters/multirotors, fixed-wing, helicopters and hybrid aircraft that was founded in 2003. Paparazzi UAV was designed with autonomous flight as the primary focus and manual flying as the secondary. From the beginning it was designed with portability in mind and the ability to control multiple aircraft within the same system. Paparazzi features a dynamic flight plan system that is defined by mission states and using way points as “variables”. This makes it easy to create very complex fully automated missions without the operators intervention. For more project information, see here.

uMap

June 16, 2017

uMap

uMap let you create maps with OpenStreetMap layers in a minute and embed them in your site:

  • Choose the layers of your map
  • Add POIs: markers, lines, polygons…
  • Manage POIs colours and icons
  • Manage map options: display a minimap, locate user on load…
  • Batch import geostructured data (geojson, gpx, kml, osm…)
  • Choose the license for your data
  • Embed and share your map

And it’s open source!

 

Marzipano – A 360° media viewer with a powerful Javascript API.

June 7, 2017

The tool generates a virtual tour from a set of panoramas and allows you to export it as web application that can be deployed as-is or used as a boilerplate for more advanced projects. Requires Firefox or Chrome.

INSPIRE GEOPORTAL

June 1, 2017

INSPIRE GEOPORTAL

The INSPIRE geoportal (link is external) provides the means to search for spatial data sets and spatial data services, and subject to access restrictions, to view spatial data sets from the EU Member States within the framework of the INSPIRE Directive.

For more info about the INSPIRE TOOLS, click HERE

ESRI Shapefile

June 1, 2017

The ESRI Shapefile (known here as the ESRI Shapefile format), stores nontopological geometry and attribute information for the spatial features in a data set. A shapefile consists minimally of a main file, an index file, and a dBASE table.

In the main file, the geometry for a feature is stored as a shape comprising a set of vector coordinates. This main file is a direct access, variable-record-length file in which each record describes a shape with a list of its vertices. In the index file, each record contains the offset of the corresponding main file record from the beginning of the main file. Attributes are held in a dBASE format file. The dBASE table contains feature attributes with one record per feature. Attribute records in the dBASE file must be in the same order as records in the main file. Each attribute record has a one-to-one relationship with the associated shape record.

The shapefile format can support point, line, and area features. Area features are represented as closed loop, double-digitized polygons.

Instances of the Shapefile format have often been used as a data exchange format from ESRI formats to non-ESRI applications. The format is most useful for writing simple features and attributes quickly as there are limitations inherent in the Shapefile format related to both geometry and attributes. As outlined elsewhere in this description, these limitations may cause loss of data when using shapefiles to contain or exchange complex geometry or attributes. The Shapefile format may be used as an intermediary between data creation applications and more functionally capable GIS formats and applications, albeit with the limitations noted in the Dataset/Normal Dataset section.

The cluster of files is typically stored in the same file directory or project workspace, with all component files having the same filename (prefix) and identified by individual file extension (suffixes). Three components are mandatory: a main file that contains the feature geometry (.shp), an index file that stores the index of the feature geometry (.shx), and a dBASE table (.dbf) that stores the attribute information of features. A comprehensive list of component files follows:

  • shp — Main file (mandatory); a direct access, variable-record-length file in which each record describes a shape with a list of its vertices.
  • shx — Index file (mandatory). In the index file, each record contains the offset of the corresponding main file record from the beginning of the main file. The index file (.shx) contains a 100-byte header followed by 8-byte, fixed-length records.
  • dbf — dBASE Table file (mandatory); a constrained form of DBF that contains feature attributes with one record per feature. The one-to-one relationship between geometry and attributes is based on record number. Attribute records in the dBASE file must be in the same order as records in the main file.
  • sbn — Part 1 of spatial index for read-write instances of the Shapefile format. If present, essential for correct processing.
  • sbx — Part 2 of spatial index for read-write instances of the Shapefile format. If present, essential for correct processing.
  • atx — Created by ArcView 3.x for each instance of the Shapefile format or dBASE attribute index created in ArcCatalog. ArcView GIS 3.x attribute indexes for shapefiles and dBASE files are not used by later versions of ArcGIS as a new attribute indexing model has been developed for shapefiles and dBASE files.
  • fbn — One of the files that store the spatial index of the features for instances of the Shapefile format that are read-only.
  • fbx — The other file (besides .fbn) that stores the spatial index of the features for instances of the Shapefile format that are read-only.
  • ain — One of the files that stores the attribute index of the active fields in a table or a theme’s attribute table.
  • aih — The other file (besides .ain) that stores the attribute index of the active fields in a table or a theme’s attribute table
  • ixs — Geocoding index for read/write shapefiles. If present, essential for correct processing.
  • mxs –Geocoding index for read-write shapefiles (ODB format).
  • prj — Projections Definition file; stores coordinate system information.
  • xml — contains metadata, as used by ArcGIS.
  • cpg — An optional file that can be used to specify the codepage for identifying the character set to be used.

See Notes for more information about filenames and contents.

LASzip – free and lossless LiDAR compression

June 1, 2017

LASzip – free and lossless LiDAR compression

LASzip – a free open source product of rapidlasso GmbH – quickly turns bulky LAS files into compact LAZ files without information loss. Terabytes of LAZ data are now available for free download from various agencies making LASzip, winner of the 2012 Geospatial World Forum Technology Innovation Award in LiDAR Processing and runner-up for innovative product at INTERGEO 2012, the de-facto standard for LiDAR compression.

 

Free LiDAR Tools

June 1, 2017

Free LiDAR Tools

BCAL LiDAR Tools

BCAL LiDAR Tools are open-source tools developed by Idaho State University, Boise Center Aerospace Laboratory (BCAL). These tools can be used for processing, analyzing and visualizing LiDAR data. They are written in IDL programming language and is intended to be used as add-on in the ENVI remote sensing software package.

FugroViewer

FugroViewer is a freeware designed for use with LiDAR and other raster- and vector-based geospatial datasets, including data from photogrammetric and IFSAR sources.

FUSION /LDV

FUSION is a LIDAR data conversion, analysis, and display software suite. FUSION allows 3-dimensional terrain and canopy surface models and LIDAR data to be fused with more traditional 2-dimensional imagery (e.g., orthophotographs, topographic maps, satellite imagery, GIS shapefiles). FUSION processes raw LIDAR data into a number of vegetation metrics. Canopy- and ground-level surface models can be produced; and then, by simple differing, canopy height models can be generated.

LASTools

LASTools is a collection of command line tools to classify, tile, convert, filter, raster, triangulate, contour, clip, and polygonize LiDAR data (to name just a few functions). All of the tools can also be run via a GUI and are available as a LiDAR processing toolbox for ArcGIS versions 9.3, 10.0, and 10.1 of ESRI.

MCC-LIDAR

MCC-LIDAR is a C++ application for processing LiDAR data in forested environments. It classifies data points as ground or non-ground using the Multiscale Curvature Classification algorithm.

Merrick’s Mars Viewer

Free viewing application supports basic LiDAR data navigation and 3D visualization – the perfect tool for casual users.

Online LiDAR viewer

View your point cloud files online in your browser! This web application works locally and does not require data transfers. Supported formats include LAS and XYZ point clouds.

Quick Terrain Reader

The Quick Terrain Reader is the free software for visualizing point clouds and pre-built digital elevation models (DEMs) in a fast and intuitive way.

QGIS Layout and Reporting Engine Campaign

May 28, 2017

QGIS Layout and Reporting Engine Campaign

How it works

Crowd funding operates by multiple organisations (or individuals!) each pledging to contribute part of the campaign’s funding goals. The composer refactoring is a large, extensive, and complex undertaking and accordingly we require 30,000€ to make this feature a reality. You can contribute part (or all) of these funds. If the funding goal is NOT reached, then no contributions are payable and the feature will not be added to QGIS.

This campaign is being targeted to the QGIS 3.0 release. To allow time for completion of the work and sufficient user testing prior to release, the deadline for the campaign is May 31 2017.

If you’d like to see the next generation of QGIS’ print composer, then your contributions are vital! Pledge, or publicise, this campaign to help it reach the funding goal before the May 31 deadline!

How to Improve OpenStreetMap Road Data with Mapillary

May 28, 2017

How to Improve OpenStreetMap Road Data with Mapillary

After seeing the diary of how to use Mapillary to add building attributes on the state of San Francisco buildings, I decided to create this article on how to use Mapillary as a tool to improve OSM road data. This article will focus on how to use Mapillary traffic sign detection to implement turn restrictions, and Mapillary imagery to add lane value and turning lanes. I won’t get into how to capture Mapillary images using smartphones or action cams, as you can find that information on the Mapillary website and you can request a car or bike mount for your smartphone to facilitate capturing.

(Please note that from my experience, after uploading the photos to Mapillary, the traffic sign detection can take from 24 to 96 hours to be processed and being displayed on the map.)

Open Route Service (Allows You to save Your route into GPX/GeoJson!)

May 24, 2017

Open Route Service

OpenRouteService.org as offers Routing services by using user-generated, collaboratively collected free geographic data from OpenStreetMap. Please donate your geographic data to openstreetmap.org!

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